Administration:
Consulting Rosarians
Officers
History of MRS
MRS Public Garden
Bronze Medal Awards
By-Laws
Standing Rules
Reimbursement Form

Membership:
Join Marin Rose Society!
Newsletter sample
Join the ARS

Upcoming Events:
Programs

Rose Culture:
Diseases
Fertilizing
Garden Good/Bad Guys
Great Roses
Hybridizing
Planting
Pruning
Watering
Annual Rose Care
Monthly Rose Care
Rose of the Month

Rose Purchasing:
Buying Roses
Mail Order Sources

Rose Shows:
Annual Rose Shows
MRS Trophies

Misc:
Poet's Corner
Rose Books
Rosey Links
Site Map
Members Only

ROSE CARE FOR NOVEMBER/DECEMBER
"WINTERIZING" YOUR GARDEN
by Lydia Truce, Consulting Rosarian

Spring, summer, fall and voila winter!!!! Fortunately or unfortunately, here in our lovely state, specifically Marin county, our winter is not snow, or ice but rather tons of rain. Normally, the rain starts in November and ends in March. So, compared to the rest of the country, our winter is mellow.

Simply put, winterizing our garden is not a complicated or mysterious task as long as you keep in mind that our plants do need some period of rest or dormancy. It is more an activity of wrapping up the cycle of plant growth as we approach fall. Doing so equips them to get the energy to bloom come spring.

The basic rule is good sanitation. So clean, clean, clean then mulch, mulch, mulch. Here are some general pointers to keep in mind:

* Get rid of all deceased and damaged plants. All obvious dead branches, canes, trunks should be put on the compost unless deceased, then they should go in the garbage.
* Remove all yellow and dead foliage and flowers.
* Pick up fallen fruits on the ground and those still hanging on the tree.
* Perennials that have stopped blooming should be cut back as low as possible.
* Divide crowded bulbs and tubers like daylilies, dahlia, and some iris.
* Annuals of course should be removed as soon as the bloom is gone and leaves have turned yellow.

As you know, fungus and bacteria overwinters on the leaves, under the bark, stems, roots and on old flowers and fruits, so dead heading is key.

For roses – same rules apply. Personally, I wait until the week between Christmas and New Years to strip ALL leaves from my roses. This way, you can get a good view of how you would want to prune them.

Next, mulch, mulch, mulch….

What exactly is mulching? Quite simply, mulch is a layer of opaque material over the soil surface. It may be inorganic or synthetic such as polyethylene black plastic or organic such as ground bark, stray, hay, rice hulls or compost. Just be sure the mulch is not placed on the stem or trunk of plants, as this could cause disease. Mulching conserves soil moisture, thus reduces water consumption. It controls weed growth as it blocks the sunlight necessary to germinate some weed seeds. It reduces soil erosion, and improves overall garden appearance.

Finally, be sure to check your irrigation system. Change to a less frequent cycle or perhaps turn it off completely should we get some rain. Let’s hope so!


Flower

A YEAR OF ROSE CARE:

January

February

March

April

May

June

July and August

September

October

November and December


Return to the Main Page

Google
Search WWW Search marinrose.org


Contact us
© Marin Rose Society
All Rights Reserved
Last Modified: 11/6/16