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Fruittree Leafroller

FAST FACTS - Fruittree Leafrollers
by Nanette Londeree, Master Rosarian

SIGNS

  • Flat egg masses on small stems or branches
  • A green larva (or caterpillar) ĺ to one inch long with a black head (when young), turning to brown that wriggle vigorously when disturbed and drop to the ground on a silken thread, March through mid-May
  • A pupa just under 1/2 inch long, light to dark brown, and is usually formed within the rolled leaf; silk webbing lines the area around the pupa

    Leafroller Adult SYMPTOMS

  • Tender new leaves with a ragged appearance
  • Leaves that are rolled and tied together with silken threads
  • Defoliated grass or other plants beneath the plant

    CAUSE

    Leafroller Damage

  • Larvae of the fruit-tree leafroller, Archips argyrospila or A. rosanus

    OPTIMAL CONDITIONS

  • Fruit or shade trees in the area
  • March through May when larvae hatch
  • Abundant tender new leaves and bud

    TREATMENT

    Prevention:

  • Maintain good garden sanitation
  • Encourage beneficial insects and birds including certain tachinid flies and ichneumonid wasps (main parasites), lacewing and certain beetles, insect eating birds (common predators)

    Elimination:

  • Inspect new foliage and look for feeding injury and the small larvae (caterpillars); trim off and destroy
  • Spray with Bacillus thuringiensis; thorough spray coverage is required for control and itís only effective on fruittree leafroller larvae when they are small (less than 1/2 inch long); it usually requires more than one application
  • Apply sprays only when there is evidence of a damaging leafroller population, such as large numbers of larvae early in the spring or large numbers of egg masses

    GOOD GUY / BAD GUY?

  • A bad guy that can make a mess of your roses, though doesnít do significant lasting damage

    Photos courtesy of Baldo Villegas; from top: fruittree larvae, adult, damage to rose and nest.


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    Last Modified: 08/06/2013